House Votes To Block Trump's Emergency

House Votes To Block Trump's Emergency

In a sign of their determination to keep our country open to illegal immigration, Democrats voted to block President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency over funding for the border security barrier. Ultimately it won’t work, but this move shows that the liberal majority in Congress will stop at nothing to thwart the administration’s goals.

Highlights

The battle to fund the border wall took another twist when House Democrats and a handful of dissident Republicans voted through a resolution to terminate President Trump’s state of emergency. The aim is simple — deny the president access to the funds needed for border security. Congressional arithmetic means the process itself is complicated, though.

  • The resolution, sponsored by Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-TX), will, if passed, terminate President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency. This will rescind his ability to divert funding from military construction to the border wall.
  • Following a fiery speech by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrat representatives voted unanimously to back the resolution. They were joined by 13 Republicans who broke ranks with their party. The final vote was 245-182 in favor, allowing the measure to pass on to the Senate.
  • There’s a chance the Senate will also approve the measure. Republicans have a 53-47 majority in the upper house, and three of them — Susan Collins (ME), Lisa Murkowski (AK) and Thom Tillis (NC) have already said they’ll support it. If the Democrats can find one more defector, the resolution will make it through.
  • The Senate debate will be privileged, meaning it can’t be filibustered out and only needs a simple majority to pass. It also has to be heard within a shorter timeframe, and it’s likely a vote will take place by March 18.
  • However, while there’s a good chance one more Republican can be persuaded to switch sides, that doesn’t mean the resolution is home free. It failed to achieve a veto-proof two-thirds majority in the House, and it isn’t likely to get one in the Senate either.
  • This means that after passing the Senate, the bill will land on the president’s desk for approval — which it won’t get. President Trump hasn’t used his veto since he’s been in office, but if there’s going to be a first time this will be it. He won’t allow the measure to pass.
  • While the House vote and whatever happens in the Senate have symbolic importance, they aren’t actually going to change anything. The real focus of opposition to the wall are the various cases now making their way through the courts.